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Galaxy S4 upsets iPhone 5 in our brutal destruction test

We dunk, scratch, and drop the two hottest smartphones to discover which is tougher. And then we run them over.

The iPhone 5 and the Samsung Galaxy S4 -- two sparkling smartphones at the top of their game. But which mobile is tougher? That's what our in-depth and brutal destruction video aims to discover. Hit play on the clip above to witness the world's greatest mobiles drowned, scratched, dropped, and crushed -- with surprising results.
For our first test you'll see both phones, which were kindly donated by U.K. gadget insurance company Protect your bubble, dunked underwater, an ordeal from which Samsung's mobile made a truly miraculous recovery. Find out exactly how much better than the iPhone 5 it fared by pressing play now.

Hands-on with the sharp, slim iPhone 5 (pictures)

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You'll also discover the unsuspecting object in your pocket or handbag that's most likely to destroy your precious smartphone's screen, and see how this simple, coastal element lays waste to both phones' toughened displays.
After that, both phones must dash to make a pressing appointment with a chunky slab of concrete. But which mobile comes off better in a bitter duel with Lady Gravity? Click play to find out.

Meet the stunning Samsung Galaxy S4 (pictures)

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Finally, we run both phones over with an enormous truck, because it seemed like the right thing to do at the time. I won't spoil the results for you, but if you happen to enjoy super-slow-motion shots of mobiles exploding beneath the immense tread of a huge tire, well, you'll probably find something here for you.
Which of these two phones is your favorite? Do you think about durability when buying a smartphone, or are there other features you care more about? Watch the video and let me know in the comments, or on our Facebook wall

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